Damascus-born Randa Hamwi Duwaji may be known for her poetry, but her work extends into directions as diverse as the lands she grew up in as the daughter of diplomats.
Making the most of her upbringing and languages, Randa has always sought to promote understanding among cultures, expressing this ambition in everything she commits to.

Promoting Understanding

Her earliest activism in this field was at nine years of age, when she received an award at the American School on the Rhine for promoting American-German Friendship...more

Style & Poetry

Randa’s literary style, free at times, or evolving from the classic at others, is influenced by a background in English Literature...more

Stories

Randa’s stories for children (9-14 yrs.) hold the distinction of being written in both English and Arabic. Providing literary enjoyment, cultural experience and environmental awareness...more

Artwork

An art lover, Randa has used pastels to paint the true-life photographs of human suffering displayed in newspapers and magazines – and has then given them voice...more

Breakthrough Project

Randa’s latest commitment is related to her study of the Arabic Qur’an and the application of a dynamic which the Qur’an itself had prescribed...more

Memberships

Randa is a member of several literary groups...more


Her earliest activism in this field was at nine years of age, when she received an award at the American School on the Rhine for promoting American-German Friendship. Later, back in Damascus between her parents’ posts, Randa witnessed the Arab-Israeli wars and began to give voice to the injustices of occupation, hoping to promote the West’s understanding of Arab issues. Such an understanding seemed even more difficult after Nine Eleven, a tragedy on all counts to this Arab-American Muslim, not just because of the loss of innocent American lives or the sense of security, but also because Arab and Islam-bashing had suddenly become acceptable, and wars upon Arab and Muslim nations seemed justified.

Perhaps influenced by her multi-cultural background, Randa sees Humanity on a single plane where all ‘Bombers’ are equally reprehensible, whether they happen to be on the ground pulling pins and pushing buttons, or in the skies releasing payloads. She voices the heartache of the innocent, from the homesickness of displaced families and house-keys that had lost their purpose, to the trauma of orphaned children and bereaved parents, to the helplessness of the elderly and those dying silently beneath bombed concrete. In doing so, she attempts to elicit in Readers the same compassion and empathy, regardless of who these victims are or where they come from.

Randa’s literary style, free at times, or evolving from the classic at others, is influenced by a background in English Literature. Post-graduate studies in Psychology have added structure to her depth of thought, acquired from decades of Qur’anic reflection.

Randa's first collection of poetry -begun at the age of nine - was published as The Winds of Time, in 1991. Her second collection Heartbeats in The Wind: Reflections of an Arab Woman was launched during the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee’s –annual convention in Washington, 2002. Never Again Shall we Forget was published and distributed at the ceremonial unveiling of the Deir Yassin Memorial at Seneca Lake, N.Y. in 2003. The memorial also bears a bronze plaque engraved with a Haiku Randa had written. In 2004, Randa presented My Heart Beats in Deutschland at the Frankfurt Book Fair which had the Arab World as guest of Honor. One of her major achievements at bridging cultures -‘Qalb ‘Arabi Mughtarib: Min Dimashq ila Ishbiliya ila New York’ (An Expatriate Arab Heart: From Damascus to Seville to New York)- was presented in 2006 as a collection of Arabic Poetry, Reflections, and Qur’anic Research, winning critical acclaim and earning her place as an ‘Arab’ poet.

Randa’s stories for children (9-14 yrs.) hold the distinction of being written in both English and Arabic. Providing literary enjoyment, cultural experience and environmental awareness, these stories have been enjoyed by many English and Arabic reading youngsters. Delightful days In Marjella, appeared in 1993; its Arabic version, The Stories of Fadi and Sana, came out in 1995. Song of a Falcon, came out as magazine episodes in 1997. Hamad, the Young Falconer was published in both languages by The Environmental Research and Wildlife Development Agency (ERWDA) in 2000.

Several schools in the U.S. and the Arab world have introduced Delightful days in Marjella to their students who have enjoyed both the stories and the ‘Fun Workbook,’ while characters from ‘Hamad, the Young Falconer’ have come to life in the U.A.E. as animations (at the Kids’ Corner, Emirates Falconers’ Club) and as role-play in school events (in collaboration between the Worldwide Fund for Nature and ERWDA).

An art lover, Randa has used pastels to paint the true-life photographs of human suffering displayed in newspapers and magazines – and has then given them voice. Framing her paintings with poignant verses of poetry, we hear these people’s sighs and sobs. From the Cape Town children clutching onto barbed wire, to the distress of the Kurdish boy, the uncertainty of Afghan youths, the bereavement of the Dhakan woman, the parting embrace of the Sarajevo mother and daughter, the tearful farewell of a mother and toddler fleeing Gorazde, and the final breath of the young Palestinian stone-thrower, The Blink of a Shutter touches viewers’ hearts.

Randa’s latest commitment is related to her study of the Arabic Qur’an and the application of a dynamic which the Qur’an itself had prescribed, allowing her to experience its message ‘as revealed’ almost 1400 years ago (rather than ‘as explained’ several centuries after revelation). With context, scientific analysis, and 1000 year old Arabic linguistics as tools, and a detachment from preconception, popular belief, and the ‘following of forefathers’ which the Qur’an itself had forbidden, this project is a unique pro-faith exegesis.

Beginning in 2010 as a page-by-page daily ‘Blog’ in a ‘One year Qur’an Study’, her work is still ongoing two years later with numerous ‘recoveries’ of many original connotations of Arabic words and beautiful Qur’anic concepts. The importance of this study is not only that it acquaints readers with the tools by which they can revive the understanding of the original Qur’an, but it also acquaints young people with the tools necessary to achieve their own potential on one hand, and bring their communities closer to lasting peace on the other. And today this project has become of even greater importance:

Today, in light of the ‘Arab Awakening’ many ‘Islamic’ scholars are readdressing age-old issues, and their work will necessarily have great impact on how ‘Muslims’ see the world, gender-related issues, people of different faiths, and also governance …. all of which are matters mentioned in the Qur’an and which Randa Hamwi Duwaji has shed light upon here, in what many readers already see as her ‘magnum opus.’

Randa Hamwi Duwaji recommend to friends if want to buy the best replica watches, or want to find the most comprehensive omega Constellation watches replica, omega DeVille watches replica, omega Seamaster replica information, you can go to omega replica watches buy them

Randa is a member of several literary groups including the National League of American Pen Women, the Arab Writers Union, Radius of Arab American Writers (RAWI), and the Phoenix Writers Club. She is also member of People to People International, and Board Member of Deir Yassin Remembered. Randa’s work continues to appear in different parts of the world, dramatized in artistic presentations, delivered as speeches, or published in anthologies, periodicals and newspapers.